Funded through a grant from the A.L. Mailman Family Foundation

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Previous Webinars
 

Building Capacity, Part 2: Strategic Partnerships,
Community Engagement, Funding, and Impacting Policy

Wednesday, December 15, 2010
2 PM EST / 11 AM PST 

Webinar Playback
Evaluation

Kathy Hepburn, MS
Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development
What Works? A Webinar Series on Effective Early Childhood Mental Health Consultation (PDF)

Marla Himmeger, LSW
Ohio Department of Mental Health
Ohio’s Early Childhood Mental Health Consultation Program (PDF)

Karen Freel, PhD
Ounce of Prevention Fund

Ashleigh Kirk, MSW
Voices for Illinois’ Children
1. Early Childhood Mental Health Consultation In Illinois (PDF)
2. Overview of Illinois Early Childhood Initiatives

Geoff Nagle, PhD, MPH, LCSW
Tulane University
Part 2: Strategic Partnerships, Community Engagement, Funding, and Impacting Policy (PDF)

Infrastructure for supporting sustainable early childhood mental health consultation services or programs includes strategic partnerships, community engagement, funding, and impacting policy. Initial funding for ECMHC programs and services is often associated with grants, studies, or seed money for pilot projects. Sustaining services may involve strong partnerships at the state, county or local levels including collaborative efforts among early care and education, child welfare, public health, and other human services agencies; including private foundations or local initiatives. Community outreach and engagement helps to build trust, forge these and new partnerships, generate awareness of program services, and discover funding opportunities. For the long-term, sustaining services depends on demonstrated efficacy of the ECMHC program or services as well as policies that support these services. Policies that support data collection, influence workforce development, infuse consultation into child serving systems, and define fiscal policies that make funding available represent those that can help to sustain consultation services.

This Webinar will build on the key findings of the What works? study by describing the specific infrastructure components listed above and showcasing models, strategies, and tools that bolster program infrastructure for effective and sustainable consultation services.

Participants in this Webinar can expect to:

  • Describe the key infrastructure elements that support sustainable ECMHC programs and services
  • Learn three program approaches to strategic partnerships and community engagement, maximizing funding opportunities, and impacting policy
  • Identify strategies, tools and resources that guide infrastructure development to support effective and sustainable ECMHC services.

 

Previous Webinars (Webinar Playback Below)

Building Capacity, Part 1:
Program Infrastructure

Wednesday, November 17, 2010
2 PM EST / 11 AM PST

Webinar Playback
Powerpoint Materials (in PDF Format)
Evaluation

Kathy Hepburn, MS
Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development

Al Zachik, MD
Maryland State Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

Rolf Grafwallner, PhD
Maryland State Department of Education

Beth Green, PhD
Portland State University

An essential component of an effective early childhood mental health consultation (ECMHC) program is a strong infrastructure that supports success. In general, the term infrastructure refers to the basic administrative and organizational elements that support program development, design, implementation, evaluation. Based on Georgetown's What works? study, effective ECMHC programs and services are supported by strong program leadership and organizational features that include having clear values and a vision for mental health services, developing a strategic plan, defining a consultation model, and establishing administrative strategies and practices that support implementation, provide oversight, and maintain adequate funding.

This Webinar will build on the key findings of the What works? study, by describing the infrastructure components listed above and taking a dual, yet parallel perspective on program infrastructure for:

  • Building an effective early childhood mental health consultation program, highlighting Maryland's statewide program
  • Preparing the early care and education setting for mental health consultation services, highlighting research and experience from the early childhood community

Participants can expect to:

  • Describe the key infrastructure elements that support effective early childhood mental health consultation services.
  • Recognize the parallel perspectives of the consultation program and the early care and education setting
  • Identify strategies, tools, and resources that help to build program infrastructure that supports early childhood mental health consultation services in both settings.



 

Evaluating Early Childhood Mental Health Consultation
Wednesday, October 27, 2010
2-3:30 EST/11:00 AM-12:30 PM PST 

Webinar Playback (total time 2:00)
Evaluation

Kathy Hepburn, MS
Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development
What Works? A Webinar Series on Effective Early Childhood Mental Health Consultation (ppt)

Deborah Perry, PhD
Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development
Maryland Early Childhood Mental Health Consultation (ECMHC) Evaluation (ppt)
Innovations Institute: Early Childhood Mental Health Consultation Evaluation 

Rosalind Kirk, PhD
Michigan State University
Evaluation of Michigan Child Care Expulsion Prevention Program (CCEP), 2007-2010 (ppt) 

Walter Gilliam, PhD
Yale University
Evaluating Early Childhood Mental Health Consultation: Evaluation and Expansion in Connecticut (ppt)

Evaluating early childhood mental health consultation is essential to determine its effectiveness to promote, prevent, and intervene in the social and emotional development of young children and their families. Evaluation helps to determine if consultation services are working or not and how it can be improved to heighten consultation’s positive impact for children, families, staff, and early childhood programs. Outcome data can also support program sustainability and expansion, including leveraging funds and other resources as well as influencing policy. In the bigger picture, evaluation helps to establish the evidence base of consultation – providing accurate, data-driven information about effective strategies for delivering services. Research and evaluating early childhood mental health consultation includes asking the right questions, identifying indicators, using valid measures, establishing data collection processes, and sharing outcomes.

This Webinar will build on the key findings of the What works? study by highlighting successful strategies for evaluating early childhood mental health consultation services, incorporating additional research on these topics, as well as showcasing models, strategies, and tools that contribute to meaningful evaluation. Participants in this Webinar can expect to:

  • Recognize the role of research and evaluation in effective early childhood mental health consultation services.
  • Describe key features and challenges of effective consultation
  • Learn about three state-wide efforts to evaluate early childhood mental health consultation services and their outcomes
  • Identify strategies, tools, and resources to support effective research and evaluation of consultation services
      

R&R: Relationships and Readiness in Early Childhood Mental Health Consultation
Wednesday, September 29, 2010
2 PM EDT / 11 AM PDT

Webinar Playback
Evaluation
Answers to Questions from Webinar 5

Kathy Hepburn, MS
Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development
What Works? A Webinar Series on Effective Early Childhood Mental Health Consultation (ppt)

Cassandra Coe, LCSW and Elia Dominguez, MA
Instituto Familiar de la Raza
Instituto Familiar de La Raza Early Childhood Mental Health Consultation (ppt)

Jordana Ash, LCSW
Kid Connects
R&R:Relationships and Readiness in Early Childhood Mental Health Consultation (ppt)

The What works? study of effective early childhood mental health consultation programs, identified positive relationships and readiness for early childhood mental health consultation as “catalysts for success”. The quality of the relationships between and among consultants and consultees (staff, family, children, etc.) and the readiness of families, staff, and programs for consultation (openness to gaining new skills and knowledge, opportunities for collaboration, etc.) are strongly associated with positive outcomes of consultation. The interaction of these two catalysts is both dynamic and developmental – a process over time, understanding, and trust.

Building and sustaining strong relationships involves the consultant’s capacity to “make a connection” with providers, family members, and children; demonstrate respect for cultural context; and build trust as well as work collaboratively. Being ready for consultation can involve various stages or readiness factors. The consultant can assess and nurture the readiness of families and early childhood programs by identifying the presence of indicators of readiness, clarifying roles and responsibilities, addressing stigma, and working in partnership.

This Webinar will build on the key findings of the What works? study by highlighting successful strategies for building strong relationships, engaging families and parents representing diverse cultures and languages, and evaluating and nurturing readiness for early childhood mental health consultation. Two study sites – Instituto de la Raza in San Francisco, CA and Kid Connects in Boulder, CO - will be showcased as relationship-based models with unique approaches to relationships and readiness. Participants in this webinar can expect to:

  • Learn about a consultation model focused on the personal context of culture and a clinical framework
  • Describe a consultation model addressing features of program, provider, or family readiness for early childhood mental health consultation and a Readiness Tool
  • Identify strategies, tools, and resources to support and nurture strong relationships and readiness for consultation services
      

High Quality Services: Interventions that Work and Successful Strategies for Serving Special Populations
Wednesday, July 28, 2010
2-3:30 PM EST/ 11 AM-12:30 PM EST

Webinar Playback
Evaluation

Kathy Hepburn, MS
Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development
What Works? A Webinar Series on Effective Early Childhood Mental Health Consultation (ppt)

Linda Brault, MA and Laura Fish, LMFT
WestEd Center for Child & Family Studies
CSEFEL: Supporting Social Emotional Competence in Infants and Young Children (PPT) 

Kathryn Falkenstern, MSW, LCSW
Morrison Child and Family Services, OR

Carole Upshur, EdD and Melodie Wenz-Gross PhD
University of Massachusetts Medical School 
Addressing Behavior Problems in Preschool Settings (ppt) 

High quality services represent a core component of an effective early childhood mental health consultation (ECMHC) program or services. They include an array of services provided through an approach that relies on relationships, collaboration, and clear communication. The array of services spans those that focus on promotion, prevention, and intervention; build the capacity of caregivers and programs; include evidence-based practices whenever possible; and are responsive to the unique needs of the staff, children, and families they serve – including those with special needs.

This Webinar will build on the key findings of the What works? study by highlighting successful strategies used by effective early childhood mental health consultants, approaches to services delivery, and the use of evidence based practices that represent high-quality services. Participants in this Webinar can expect to:

  • Recognize essential features of high quality early childhood mental health consultation services.
  • Describe three evidence-based interventions used in early childhood mental health consultation models
  • Identify issues related to implementation and evaluation in each consultation model
  • Consider the requirements for delivery, challenges and successes for each evidence based intervention in a consultation model
  • Identify resources and links for additional information about evidence-based interventions in high quality early childhood mental health consultation services


Preparing and Supporting the Workforce, Part 2:
Training and Supervision of ECMHC Consultants
Wednesday, June 30, 2010
2 PM EDT / 11 AM PDT 

Webinar Playback
Evaluation
Answers to Questions from Webinar 3

Kathy Hepburn, MS
Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development
What Works? A Webinar Series on Effective Early Childhood Mental Health Consultation

Kadija Johnston, L.C.S.W.
UCSF Infant-Parent Program/Day Care Consultants, California
The UCSF Daycare Consultant’s Approach to Training (ppt)
Daycare Consultants Training Description (pdf)
Daycare Consultants Training Syllabus (pdf)

Mary Mackrain, M.Ed., IMH-E® (IV)
Child Care Expulsion Prevention, Michigan
Michigan’s Statewide Approach for Supporting ECMH Consultants - Working with Infants, Young Children and Their Families (ppt)

Deborah Hirschland, M.S.W.
Consultant, Together for Kids, Massachusetts
Preparing and Supporting the Workforce, Part 2 - Training and Supervision of ECMH Consultants (ppt)

Highly-qualified consultants represent a core component of an effective early childhood mental health consultation (ECMHC) program or services. It can be challenging to find consultants that have all of the necessary or desirable competencies and characteristics that are key to an effective consultation program or services. As a career path, ECMHC is an emerging and growing work force opportunity; in transition from one of broad diversity in terms of training, experience, roles, responsibilities, and work expectations to one that has specific expertise in early childhood mental health and specific skills required to take on the role of consultant. A variety of approaches exist for training and supervising consultants: systematic in-service training, intensive pre-service training, and a few certificate or credentialing programs. Supervision, an essential support to consultants, can also take many forms including administrative, clinical, and reflective.

This webinar will build on the key findings of the What works? study, by describing common and diverse approaches to training and supervision of early childhood mental health consultants, incorporating additional research on this topic, as well as showcasing models, strategies, and tools that contribute to a prepared and supported workforce. Participants in this webinar can expect to:

  • Describe the state of work force development and preparation for early childhood mental health consultants
  • Learn approaches to training and supervision of early childhood mental health consultants
  • Identify strategies, tools, and resources to support consultant training and supervision


Preparing and Supporting the Workforce, Part 1:
Key Skills, Attributes, and Characteristics of ECMHC Consultants

Wednesday, May 26, 2010
2 PM EDT / 11 AM PDT  

Webinar Playback Part 1
Webinar Playback Part 2
Evaluation
Answers to Questions from Webinar 2

Kathy Hepburn, MS
Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development
What Works? Study on Early Childhood Mental Health Consultants: Preparing and Supporting the Workforce (ppt)

Pamala Trivedi, PhD
Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development
ECMH Consultation: a perspective from a school psychologist serving on a developmental team (ppt)

Elizabeth Bicio, LCSW
Early Childhood Consultation Partnership
Advanced Behavioral Health, Inc.
Early Childhood Mental Health Consultants - Early Childhood Consultation Partnership (ppt)

Resources:

Highly-qualified consultants represent a core component of an effective early childhood mental health consultation program or services. These consultants possess core areas of knowledge that serve as a foundation for working effectively with young children, families, and caregivers in early childhood settings. A consultant’s skills help them to build the capacity of caregivers and programs to support the social and emotional development of children in their care. The consultant’s attributes or characteristics influence the relationship-based and collaborative aspects of effective mental health consultation.

This webinar will build on the key findings of the What works? study, by detailing the key skills, attributes and characteristics of ECMH consultants, incorporating additional research on this topic, as well as showcasing models, strategies, and tools that contribute to a prepared workforce. Participants in this Webinar can expect to:

  • Identify core areas of knowledge, key skills, attributes, and characteristics of effective ECMH consultants
  • Consider a consultant’s perspective on professional preparation and on-the-job requirements
  • Explore how the qualifications, characteristics, and experience of an ECMH consultant influence the recruitment, program “match”, and plans to support ECMH consultants
  • Identify strategies and tools to assist in assessing these consultant qualities in the hiring and support process

 

An Introduction to Effective Early Childhood Mental Health Consultation: An Overview of Study Findings
Wednesday, April 28, 2010
2 PM EDT / 11 AM PDT

Webinar Playback with Audio 

Roxane Kaufmann, MS, Deborah Perry, PhD, and Kathy Hepburn, MS
Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development   

Presentation Materials:  

Webinar Description:  In recent years, there has been growing concern among many in the early care and education community that increasing numbers of very young children are manifesting behavior problems. Early childhood mental health consultation (ECMHC) is emerging as an effective strategy for addressing these challenging behaviors and support children’s social/emotional development in early care and education settings. Georgetown University Center for Child for Child and Human development completed a study, What works? A study of effective early childhood mental health consultation, to provide data-driven guidance on consultation program design including:

  • Essential components of effective mental health consultation programs
  • Skills, competences, and credentials of effective consultants
  • Training supervision and support needs of consultants
  • Level of intervention intensity required for good outcomes
  • Outcomes to be targeted and how they should be measured

This introductory webinar will set the framework for the series of 8 webinars designed to share key findings of this study, showcase diverse models and approaches to ECMHC, and engage participants in discussion of issues in the field of early childhood mental health. Participants in this introductory webinar can expect to:

  • Understand the context of the research study
  • Learn key findings and a framework for effective ECMHC programs